Press

Aaron Gordon Construction has been featured in several San Francisco Bay Area journals and magazines.

“Playland”

Spaces Magazine

What happens when the worlds of computer and board games collide with reality? You get the kind of individualistic interiors that Scott Taylor, a VP of video game development at Zynga, and hos wife, Kristine Boyden, a West Coast president for publicity firm Edelman, orchestrated with artful collaborators, including builder Aaron Gordon, architect Ari Gessler and interior designer Tineka Triggs

- Zahid Sardar

Featured in-Marin Magazine

Marin Magazine

Studio Becker, gathered 16 teams of Bay Area designers to create artful bicycles for auction. Two members of the AGC company, Aaron Gordon and Joshua Ebersole, assisted two different teams in the designing, creating, and executing of their bicycle sculptures. These sculptures were then auctioned off to raise money for disadvantaged youth in the Bay Area.

“Think You Don’t Have Space for a Statement Bath?”

Houzz

Scale down the tub. Install a petite version of a statement piece for all the impact of a full-size model in a fraction of the space. This scaled-down free-standing tub gives this tiny bathroom a classical vibe, complemented by tiled flooring, a traditional-style shower ring and curtain, smart paneling, and striking art.

‘Houzz porn’: drool-worthy home makeovers.

San Francisco Chronicle

In renovating their 1889 flat in the Castro, Kristine Boyden and Scott Taylor wanted to respect its Victorian aesthetic while infusing their own style and modernizing.

Houzz helps remodelers nail down their dreams

San Francisco Chronicle

Who doesn’t love house porn? Striking before” and after” shots of places that went from yuck to chic; peeks inside lavish abodes owned by folks more fabulous than you: Yum!

A Twisted Victorian in San Francisco.

California Home+Design

At their first meeting, the owners of this 1,500-square-foot flat in San Francisco made it a point to tell architect Karen Curtiss that what they wanted to do to their home didn’t make financial sense. They knew they could buy a house with the money they planned to spend on the condo,” Curtiss says.